Archive for the ‘unit study’ category

My Homeschool Curriculum Style

May 9, 2011

The Ultimate Homeschool Blogroll

I’m linking up with the Ultimate Homeschool Blogroll to share our homeschool curriculum and teaching style with you.

As a 14-year homeschool veteran, we tried many approaches to education over the years.  If I had to choose one style that best described us, I would say that we had a unit study homeschool.

We loved to choose a subject, then selected books, field trips, movies, art projects, writing projects, photography scavenger hunts, etc., around the chosen subject.

I did approach math with a traditional textbook.  That seemed to work best for us.  In addition to the math book, I had a closet full of math manipulatives and logic puzzles for the kids to play with during our read aloud time.

Science projects were always fun at our house.  I don’t do scientific formula type of math, but the kids loved to do basic physics, basic chemistry with hands-on experiments. We loved learning about the human body, and we really loved animal studies and botany/gardening.

As the kids reached high school, our field trips had to give way to more traditional textbook and laboratory learning in order to complete requirements for college admission.

All in all, we had a ton of fun, and I loved being home with my kids.  My children have all done really well in adulthood, and have thanked me for homeschooling them.

Keep it up, moms. You can do it!

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Cinco de Mayo Giveaway!

April 30, 2011

Enter your name and email here, and you may be a winner!

Five lucky “Cinco de Mayo” winners will each
receive a prize bundle containing helpful homeschool economics resources:

Deadline to enter the contest is 11:59 p.m. on May 5, 2011.

-Symbols on American Money
-A Day in the Life of the FOMC
-Benjamin Franklin, and the Birth of a Paper Money Economy

One very lucky winner will get to attend a two-session summer elective class gratis (for FREE!)

The winner may choose from age-appropriate electives:

Best for ages 8-13
-Fascinating First Ladies
-Peerless Presidents
-Fearless Founders
-All About Money

Best for ages 11-18
-Savvy Stewardship
-Financial Series-Federal Reserve
-Financial Series-Banking

Don’t miss out! Enter to win today. Deadline to enter the contest is 11:59 p.m. on May 5, 2011.

And the Winners Are…

March 10, 2011

Thank you for attending my Open House event!

Here are the winners of the 3 book set:
Melissa
Tracy

And the winners of the 2 book set:
Bailee
Tiara
Clarina

Congratulations! and thanks for stopping by my Open House. I wish I could have fed you brownies and coffee, but alas, it wasn’t to be.

If we ever meet face to face, the coffee’s on me, okay?

There’s still time to enroll, but hurry, classes start Monday, 3/14.

New! Homework Evaluation Service to make your homeschool mom job even easier.
$35 per student, per course for help evaluating the homework that is assigned.

Summer School begins June 21st and goes through August 8th.
Courses offered are Economics and U.S. Government for Middle and High School students.

I’m looking forward to serving your family.

New Economics Text for Middle Schoolers

December 9, 2010

I’m thrilled with the newest Economics text from the Ludwig von Mises Institute, “Lessons for the Young Economist”. Robert Murphy’s text is meant to be a great beginning economics education for students in high school.  After reading it over, I intend to use this text for middle schoolers as well.

As homeschool parents, we are confident in our curriculum choices for the elementary grades, and we prepare for the rigors of high school advancement, but we often lack a solid plan for education during the middle school years.  Why wait for high school to introduce a subject like Economics? “Lessons for the Young Economist” is a great resource for teaching this required subject at a level that your student can easily understand.

Each chapter is brief, but meaty, and introduces key economic terms and phrases. Modern language and examples make the text interesting and easy to read.  At the end of each chapter the author has included a brief lesson recap, list of new terms, and study questions.  A few chapters are labeled “Advanced”; parents of middle school students can easily choose to skip these chapters at their discretion.

“Lessons for the Young Economist” is a wonderful resource for teaching economics to the middle school student.  Don’t let your middle schooler languish as they wait to begin high school studies. Get them started with their economics education, and finish these much-needed credits.